Steam for Linux gaming the latest Survey results

steam-linux-gaming-latest-survey-results

Valve published their monthly statistics on the Steam gaming platform.The February 2013 Hardware & Software survey results show that the adoption of Linux has doubled in the past month (click on the “OS Version” stats to see all Operating Systems, not just Windows).

While Ubuntu is obviously taking the largest part of the Linux pie. Hence the total percentage of Linux Steam gamers. Therefore this is between 2 and 3 (Slackware being hidden in the “Other” platforms). This means Linux as a gaming platform is about to overtake Apple’s OS (at least, for Steam). Who says that Linux users are freeloaders. Because they have no interest in anything that is not open source and gratis?

How are we doing as Slackware community? If you look at the Slackware Group page on the SteamCommunity site. You will see that we are about to pass the 100 members mark. I think that one month ago, that number was 13. So, the group is expanding fast, and it is good to see that Slackers are die-hard gamers too 🙂

I updated my steamclient package to the latest officially released version 1.0.0.35yesterday.

It’s still a 32-bit Steam client of course. And all Steam games are 32-bit, so either you have to run 32-bit Slackware. Or install my multilib package set on top of your 64-bit Slackware (multilib installation instructions here). The good news is that you do not have to install anything else to use the Steam client and play games. All the dependencies that are in use to add to the steam client directory are no longer necessary. These libraries are now all part of the “steam-runtime” to include the steam client package.

We highly recommend you to have a NVIDIA/ATI powered graphics card inside your computer. Which uses a proprietary binary graphics drivers for these cards!

Only if you want to be able to watch the game demo-video and promotional content in the Steam Store (inside the Steam client), you need to have the flashplayer-plugin installed. For 64-bit multilib systems that means, grab the 32-bit flash player plugin package, and use convertpkg-compat32 (part of my compat32-tools) to convert that package into a “compat32″ package which can be used on a multilib Slackware64. Note that Adobe releases regular security updates for the Flashplayer, so be sure to check for updates to my package. You can keep an eye on the repository RSS feed if you don’t want to miss out.

Want to try? Install the steamclient, get Team Fortress 2 for free and start playing this adrenaline-powered multiplayer online game. And become the newest member of the Steam Slackware Group!

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