Tag Archives: cdr database

Soon, Duke Nukem 3D: Megaton Edition to Arrive on Steam for Linux

Duke Nukem 3D: Megaton Edition, a collection of games developed by 3D Realms and General Arcade, will arrived on Steam for Linux.

The Duke Nukem 3D: Megaton Edition comprises several titles, including Duke Nukem 3D: Atomic Edition and three unique expansion packs, as well as the original version of the classic game.

There is no definitive date for the launch of this amazing package on the Linux platform, but you can see more details about it on the official Steam website.

The information about the Linux version is taken from the CDR database and by no means is it completely certain. The CDR Database is a record of data that describes every Steam game and subscription provided by Valve for the Steam service.

Usually, the new entries in the Steam database are first visible in the CDR Database before their official launch.

Reblogged from: news.softpedia.com

”linux-game-gaming-gamer-news” title="Linux Game Gaming News

Hotline Miami Action Game Coming to Steam for Linux

”hotline-miami-action-game-coming-to-steam-for-linux”

Hotline Miami, a 2D action game developed by Dennaton Games and published by Devolver Digital, will arrive on Steam for Linux. 

Hotline Miami is a brutal action game that relies on hard-boiled gunplay. It’s built on 2D engine, but it features over 1,000 different sprites and benefits from a story than spans over more than 20 levels. 

According to its developers, the game is set in an alternative 1989 Miami. The player will take the role of a mysterious antihero on a murderous rampage against the shady underworld. 

The information about the Linux version is taken from the CDR database and by no means is it completely certain. The CDR Database is a record of data that describes every Steam game and subscription provided by Valve for the Steam service. 

Usually, the new entries in the Steam database are first visible in the CDR Database before their official launch. 

Reblogged from: news.softpedia.com

”linux-game-gaming-gamer-news” title="Linux Game Gaming News

 

Altitude 2D Multiplayer Action Game coming to Linux

”Altitude-2D-Multiplayer-Action-Game-to-Arrive-on-Linux”

Altitude, a multiplayer action game developed and published by Nimbly Games, will be arriving on Steam for Linux, soon.

Altitude is a 2D action game, in which the player controls a plane and fights in huge multiplayer battles, against friends or other online users.

The game comes with a few multiplayer modes, including Free For All, Team Deathmatch, Demolition, and 1-life Deathmatch. Players can also cooperate with other players and join The Altitude ProLeague, a competitive tournament scene.

The information about the Linux version is taken from the CDR database and by no means is it completely certain . The CDR Database is a record of data that describes every Steam game and subscription provided by Valve for the Steam service.

Usually, the new entries in the Steam database are first visible in the CDR Database before their official launch.

Reblogged from: news.softpedia.com

”linux-game-gaming-gamer-news” title="Linux Game Gaming News

Steam for Linux game list leaks out early

Steam for Linux game list leaks out early

Steam for Linux is set to get a raft of classic gaming titles at launch, if new entries on Valve’s CDR database are anything to go by.

Entries in Valve’s Content Description Record database for Steam have appeared listing native Linux support for a raft of games, giving those looking forward to the digital distribution system’s appearance on the open source OS a hint of things to come.

Held by Valve itself, the Content Description Record (CDR) database is used to distribute information regarding available games to the Steam client software. Access, however, is open, which has led to the development of CDR parserscapable of providing data above and beyond that revealed by the Steam client itself. With games appearing in the CDR database ahead of their reveal in the Steam client, this includes pre-release information – and, in this case, support for an as-yet unreleased Linux Steam client.

According to a community list of Steam games with native Linux versions those taking part in the Linux Steam Beta can expect to play a selection of somewhat outdated games at launch comprising Amnesia: The Dark Descent, Crusader Kings 2, Cubemen, Dynamite Jack, Eversion, Galcon Fusion, Serious Sam 3: BFE, Solar 2, SpaceChem, Steel Storm: Burning Retribution, Superbrothers: Sword and Sworcery EP, Trine 2, Waveform and World of Goo.

Of those games, native Linux versions have been available for some time making them obvious choices for Valve to test out its native Linux Steam client while it works on improving the performance of its own first-party titles on the operating system. While a good selection of games, the list is but a small percentage of the overall number of games already listed on Steam which have a Linux port available – suggesting that the quantity could grow rapidly at launch.

With Valve boss Gabe Newell personally overseeing the Steam for Linux client development, and vocal in his dislike for Microsoft’s upcoming Windows 8 OS, the Steam Linux client looks on set for a high-profile launch – just nine years after the service appeared on Windows.

Source: bit-tech.net

”linux-game-gaming-gamer-news” title="Linux

Steam for Linux has appeared on CDR Database

Valve had announced in July that its extremely popular digital distribution platform, Steam, will be making its way to Linux, along with a port of Left 4 Dead 2, since a platform for selling games would be useless without any games to sell. Now, the beta for Steam Linux has made its way to the CDR Database, which is an open list of all items available on Steam.

This marks a big step forward for the future of gaming on Linux machines. It also helps that Left 4 Dead reportedly works much better on Linux than it does on Windows, according to an earlier report. On a considerably high end computer, Left 4 Dead 2 runs faster on Linux than on Windows. “We are using a 32-bit version of Linux temporarily and will run on 64-bit Linux later.”  The post on the Steam Linux blog continues, “Running Left 4 Dead 2 on Windows 7 with Direct3D drivers, we get 270.6 FPS as a baseline. The data is generated from an internal test case.”

Steam for Linux has made its way to the CDR Database

The blog reports that originally, the initial port of Left 4 Dead 2 was only running at 6 FPS (frames per second). They then had to optimise the code to work better with the Linux kernel and OpenGL; they even had to optimise the graphics driver. After these modifications, the blog reports that Left 4 Dead 2 is running at 303.4 FPS on their high end testing machine. The tests were done on a machine running on Intel Core i7 3930k with an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 680 GPU and 32GB of RAM. On the software side, they used Windows 7 Service Pack 1 64-bit and Ubuntu 12.04 32-bit.

Valve had started a developer blog dedicated to porting Steam and Left 4 Dead 2. “Avoid the rumors and speculations that multiply on the Web. Instead, come to the source – a blog where people who are interested in Linux and open source game development can get the latest information on Valve’s efforts in this arena,” says the first post on the blog.

The first post on the blog stated that Gabe Newell, head of Valve, had been interested in the possibility of moving Steam and the Source Engine to Linux. It continues, “At the time, the company was already using Linux by supporting Linux-based servers for Source-based games and also by maintaining several internal servers (running a 64-bit version of Ubuntu server) for various projects. In 2011, based on the success of those efforts and conversations in the hallway, we decided to take the next step and form a new team. At that time, the team only consisted of a few people whose main purpose was investigating the possibility of moving the Steam client and Left 4 Dead 2 over to Ubuntu.”

The reason they picked Ubuntu is because they want to first work on a single distribution, as it reduces the variability of testing space and makes early iterations easier and faster. Another reason for picking Ubuntu is because it is one of the most popular distributions of Linux, and “has recognition with the general gaming and developer communities.”

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