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The Horror of Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs Now Available

Frictional Games have announced that the first-person horror game “Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs” is now available for PC, Mac and Linux. Players can purchase the game for $19.99 and step into the year 1899 for a grotesque adventure. The game doesn’t involve combat, puzzles or the like but instead encourages players to become engulfed into the game’s world and then run for their lives!

From the Press Release

Switch off the lights and try not to wake the neighbors with your grotesque cries. The premier name in horror is back with Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs, available today.

The year is 1899. Wealthy industrialist Oswald Mandus has returned home from a disastrous expedition to Mexico. Wracked by fever, haunted by dreams of a dark machine, he recovers consciousness in his own bed with no idea of how much time has passed since his last memory. As he struggles to his feet, somewhere beneath him, an engine splutters, coughs, roars into life…

From the creators of Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Dear Esther comes a new first-person horror game that will drag you into the depths of greed, power and madness. It will bury its snout into your ribs and it will eat your heart. Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs is survival–horror at its most unsettling; helpless and alone, no weapons to soothe your nerves, and only the dim light of your lantern to offer any comfort.

For Windows, Mac, and LinuxAmnesia: A Machine for Pigs is available for $19.99 at online stores, including: Steam, GOG, Gamefly, GamersGate, Desura, Mac Game Store

Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs‘ narrative-driven horror, free of combat and complex puzzles, instead encourages players to entrench themselves in the world, be consumed by its ambiance, and run for their lives.

Linux System Requirements

Minimum:

  • OS: Major Linux Distribution from 2010.
  • Processor: High-range Intel Core i3 / AMD A6 CPU or equivalent.
  • Memory: 2 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Mid-range NVIDIA GeForce 200 / AMD Radeon HD 5000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
  • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space

Recommended:

  • OS: Major Linux Distribution from 2012
  • Processor: High-range Intel Core i5 / AMD FX CPU or equivalent.
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Graphics: High-range NVIDIA GeForce 400 / AMD Radeon HD 6000. Integrated Intel HD Graphics should work but is not supported; problems are generally solved with a driver update.
  • Hard Drive: 5 GB available space

To learn more, visit the official Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs website.

Reblogged from:  biogamergirl.com

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Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs – first Look

Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs review and first look

Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs has made me question my sanity, or, at least, it’s made me question my memories of playing the original Amnesia: The Dark Descent nearly three years ago. Admittedly, we don’t have an acute recollection of the entire experience, but the sheer, overriding terror that The Dark Descent instilled is something we will likely carry forever.

But now we find the truth of that ingrained emotion in doubt, because the same terror is seldom to be found in Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs. Don’t get me wrong, its gruesome world is lovingly crafted in disgusting detail, and its tale is horrifying in the truest sense of the word – but we wouldn’t really call it frightening.

Set in London in 1899, A Machine for Pigs centers on industrialist Oswald Mandus. As Mandus, you awaken in a four-poster bed – with iron bars where the curtains should be. It was the sound of your children that roused you, and now you must find them. It’s immediately clear that there’s something wrong about your surroundings, and the warning signs are everywhere. There are bars on the beds and windows, elaborate locks on the drawers. There are hidden passages behind the walls, designed for secretly observing the occupants of the mansion. More unsettling still, the entire mansion is occasionally rocked by mechanical rumblings from below. The simple conceit of Mandus finding his children sets up the entire adventure, leading him to explore the mansion, the abutting processing plant and, most importantly, the massive, mysterious machine below it all.

We like to throw the word horror around, usually as a synonym for extreme fear, but I think the true meaning is more nuanced than that. To find real horror, you have look to the limits of what man is capable of – destroying life, perverting nature, creating monsters. Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs hits the mark on all counts, weaving a story of grief, insidious madness and vile machinery.

As in Amnesia: The Dark Descent, a good deal of the story is told through documents scattered about Mandus’ property. Discovered out of order, these journal writings slowly reveal Mandus’ relationship with his children, the function of the machine and the madness that inspired its creation. The story can be a little convoluted at times, and some of the documents too poetic for their own good, but suffice it to say that by the end, you will witness real horror, the kind that only man could dream up.

Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs

As horrific as the story is, though, it’s not without problems. Many players will likely predict some of A Machine for Pigs‘ revelations long before they occur. It’s still nice to be rewarded with the grisly details of a plot point whenever you uncover a specific document or reach a certain area, but the full impact is dulled when you know what’s coming. Furthermore, while Mandus’ children serve as the primary motivation to move forward, I never felt any emotional attachment to them. We didn’t get to know them at all, and were never really given a reason to care about them. They were just two faceless, soulless character models we occasionally saw for a fleeting moment. Horror and children can be a powerful mix, but A Machine for Pigs fails to fully capitalize on that potential.

Mechanically, A Machine for Pigs deviates significantly from The Dark Descent, and this is where it’s most disappointing. The Dark Descent employed several mechanics that ratcheted up the fear and tension, most notably the insanity system. Whenever The Dark Descent‘s protagonist, Daniel, was in the dark or near monsters, his sanity eroded. Loss of sanity would cause you to hear unpleasant noises, and your vision would blur and movement would become unsteady. On top of this was the sound of Daniel’s own ragged breathing, and the overall effect was deeply disturbing.

The only way to maintain Daniel’s sanity (and your own) was to light candles and torches with limited tinderboxes, or use your trusty lantern, which had a limited supply of oil. Furthermore, solving puzzles and completing objectives restored Daniel’s sanity, providing players with the perfect reason to keep pushing through a frightening ordeal.

A Machine for Pigs does away with all of that. The sanity system is gone. Tinderboxes and oil have been obviated by an electric lantern that never runs out of power, and consequently we rarely felt frightened, never having to worry about being trapped in the dark as my mind went south for the winter. The lantern will occasionally flicker or go out entirely, but this is usually just a signal that a monster is nearby, which, again, sucks the air out of a good scare.

There are, however, a few monster encounters that are genuinely trying. As in the Dark Descent, you’re unable to defend yourself at all, so the best scenarios – by which I mean the most unnerving – are the ones that force you to either move directly toward a beastie or actively run like hell from it. Without the sanity system though, some of the edge has been taken off.

That’s not to say that A Machine for Pigs doesn’t have a few mentally taxing tricks of its own. The architecture of the environment, for example, may suddenly shift when you aren’t looking. You may discover that a doorway you just walked through has disappeared. You may find a wall where thirty seconds ago there was a hallway – and a new hallway where there was a wall. It’s a subtle device, and the first time we experienced it, we were not sure whether it had happened at all. It’s creepy and perfect for a game about madness.

But a little creepiness is nothing compared to the fear of quavering in the dark with only one tinderbox and a few drops of oil left in your lamp, and that’s likely to be a sticking point for many Amnesia fans. Without these elements, A Machine for Pigs leans entirely on its environment and story, which are essentially the same thing: the machine and its twisted workings. Mandus’ journey into its clockwork belly is certainly a grisly one, punctuated by moments of disquieting and hideous awe. This is when the game is at its best, when it pulls back and simply allows you to witness the horror of its world, the darkest threshold of a man’s heart.

That’s enough to make Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs worth playing, so long as you can accept that it won’t make you squeal.

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Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs Pre-Order and Save 20 Percent

Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs is now available for pre-order with a 20% discount. Fans will be able to pick up the game for Windows, Mac and Linux for $15.99 with the special pre-order discount.
From the Press Release
It’s time to step back into the darkness. Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs, the follow-up to the genre-defining horror game, Amnesia: The Dark Descent, is now available for pre-order with a 20-percent discount.


The year is 1899. Wealthy industrialist Oswald Mandus has returned home from a disastrous expedition to Mexico, which has ended in tragedy. Wracked by fever, haunted by dreams of a dark machine, he recovers consciousness in his own bed, with no idea of how much time has passed since his last memory. As he struggles to his feet, somewhere beneath him, an engine splutters, coughs, roars into life…

From the creators of Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Dear Esther comes a new first-person horror game that will drag you to the depths of greed, power and madness. It will bury its snout into your ribs and it will eat your heart. Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs is survival–horror at its most unsettling; helpless and alone, no weapons to soothe your nerves, and the dim light of your lantern to offer any comfort.

For Windows, Mac, and Linux, Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs is available for $15.99 ($19.99 regularly) at these digital distributors:

Steam
GOG
Humble Store
Gamefly
GamersGate
Desura
Mac Game Store

To learn more, visit the official Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs website.

Reblogged from: biogamergirl.com

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Amnesia: A Machine For Pigs Screenshots Lack Horror

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Thechineseroom has sent out an additional round of screenshots from Amnesia: A Machine For Pigs. Though Pigs is a horror game, don’t expect these images to frighten you. They merely show off some of the environments from the upcoming PC/Mac/Linux game.

A Machine for Pigs stars an industrialist named Oswald Mandus. After a personal tragedy, he begins having nightmares about a mysterious machine. He wakes up one day to find that his home is now occupied by pig-like monsters.

While the developers haven’t said much about the gameplay, it should be similar to that of predecessor Amnesia: Dark Descent. Players won’t be fighting monsters. Instead, they have to run and hide from any enemies they encounter. When they’re not fleeing for their lives, players will have to solve puzzles throughout the game world.

Still, there should be some important differences between Descent and Machine for PigsPigs isn’t being developed by Frictional Games. Instead, they’re acting as publisher while Dear Esther studio thechineseroom handles development.

The screenshots don’t show any of the monsters that players encounter. To my knowledge, these monsters haven’t actually made appearances in any of the screens or trailers released thus far. That’s just fine with me. I’d rather be surprised when I’m playing through the game for the first time.

Machine for Pigs is expected this summer.

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Reblogged from: cinemablend.com

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Amnesia: A Machine For Pigs Is In The Very Capable Hands Of Dear Esther Dev

The Dark Descent is widely considered to be one of the most terrifying games of all time. Its powerful blend of pants-shittingly terrifying moments and a dense, foreboding atmosphere made it the most successful of Frictional Games’ arsenal of horror titles, both critically and commercially. With its upcoming sequel, dubbed A Machine For Pigs, Frictional didn’t have the manpower to get it done. That’s when they turned to indie horror developer thechineseroom — the team that gave us the deeply emotional Dear Esther — to make sure its sequel would live up to the astronomically high bar set by its predecessor.

In an interview with Gamasutra, thechineseroom’s Dan Pinchbeck discussed the game and what his team is doing to live up to fans’ expectations. Head past the break for more!

Pinchbeck’s team plans on investing quite a bit into the visuals department, “With this new game, we want to create a world that is so rich and dramatic and beautiful that the player is constantly torn between wanting to go around the corner to see what’s there and not wanting to go around the corner because they’re frightened of what’s there,” Pinchbeck told Gamasutra.

“The thing is, if we don’t frighten people as much as the original, then we’ve failed,”, he continued. “But now we have to frighten people that know what to expect. The big design challenge is: How do we protect the things that make Amnesia great, and how do we evolve everything else to make a really fresh experience?”

In case you’re still not convinced that he and his team want to make this a thoroughly terrifying experience, when discussing the game’s world, Pinchbeck said he wants it to feel like “something has burrowed into your head and is just scratching its nails at you. But you’re so hooked. Inside, you’re peeling away like bodies from a pile and you just can’t stop yourself,”

I can’t wait.

Amnesia: A Machine For Pigs is expected to release by Halloween this year, for the PC, Mac, and Linux. With thechineseroom working on the Amnesia sequel, this leaves Frictional Games open to work on their unannounced horror game for consoles.

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