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Elegy for a Dead World now released for Linux, Mac and Windows PC

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Elegy for a Dead World from Dejobaan Games is now #available for #Linux, Mac, and Windows PC on Steam for $14.99 with launch discount of 10%. The game is interesting for a couple of reasons. First, #gameplay encourages players to write their own creative stories based on locations they visit and the people they meet within several locations throughout the game.

Secondly, this is a crowdfunded game that is actually finished and being released: Elegy raised 150 percent of its funding goal in its Kickstarter campaign earlier this year. During development, it received two IndieCade nominations, an Independent Games Festival Honorable Mention and a GDC Experimental Gameplay workshop selection.

Development began in October, 2013 with a week-long experiment intended as a “palate cleanser” for both Dejobaan and Popcannibal. Studio heads Ichiro Lambe and Ziba Scott sat down in the kitchen of Boston’s Indie Game Collective co-working space and scrawled the initial design out on pieces of 8.5″x11″ paper.

Gameplay Features:

  • Players explore three worlds based on the works of British Romantic Era poets:
    • Shelley’s World, based on Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley
    • Byron’s World, based on Darkness by Lord Byron
    • Keats’ World, based on When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be by John Keats
  • Each world includes multiple sets of “writing challenges” which help players create different stories (e.g. a short story about a politician’s final address; a poem about a young girl’s final days; a song about discovering long-dead worlds; etc.).

Each of the game’s 27 writing challenges inspire you to create narratives about the worlds from different perspectives. In one challenge, you play an archaeologist uncovering clues and writing about a city’s final days; in another, you’re a thief, composing a song about searching the wreckage for valuables; and in another, you pen a lament in rhyming couplets.

Tougher challenges include writing puzzles. For instance (spoiler ahead!), in one challenge, Elegy has you describe the beauty of a world and its lost culture, only to remind you, halfway through, that you’re the one who destroyed it. Your job is then to reconcile your love for the world and your justifications for its destruction.

Dejobaan also claims that educators are also using the game to inspire students to use English as a second language (ESL), creative writing exercises, and game design classes at nearly 50 institutions in 13 countries.

You can learn more about the game at Dejobaan.com, watch the video to your left, or simply hit its Steam product page for more information.

Elegy for a Dead World coming to Linux, Mac and PC with your support on Kickstarter

Elegy for a Dead World described as “part video game, part creative #writing exercise and part sociological experiment.” It’s a fascinating concept, but #developers Dejobaan Games (Drunken Robot Pornography) and Popcannibal (Girls Like Robots) need some additional funding to push it past the 11th hour of its dev cycle.

[kickstarter url=https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/dejobaan/elegy-for-a-dead-world-a-game-about-writing-fictio width=”480″]

“Development started in October 2013 on what was initially a week-long experiment. It has since grown into a passion project that we’ve been self-funding. We’re committed to finishing this project, but we need your help to give it the final push,” the developer explained on its Kickstarter page.

“After nearly a year in development, Elegy is almost finished,” it added, but there’s still a few coats of polish it wants to apply before it releases its audacious art project into the wild. Mostly, it just needs to fund additional painting and animations, soundscapes, and writing prompts to further flesh out its worlds… or get you to flesh them out anyway.

Features

  • Players explore three worlds based on the works of British Romantic Era poets:
    • Shelley’s World, based on Ozymandias by Percy Bysshe Shelley
    • Byron’s World, based on Darkness by Lord Byron
    • Keats’ World, based on When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be by John Keats
  • Each world includes multiple sets of “writing prompts” which help players create different stories (e.g. a short story about a politician’s final address; a poem about a young girl’s final days; a song about discovering long-dead worlds; etc.).

Backers can spend $10 to receive a Steam key for the game on Linux, Mac and Windows PC upon its early 2015 release. Or you can get in on the fun later this month by spending $25 and getting a beta code as soon as the Kickstarter ends on 21st October.

So far Elegy for a Dead World has only raised $12,216 of its $48K goal, but it just launched its crowdfunding campaign earlier today.

elegy_for_a_dead_world_coming_to_linux_mac_and_pc_on_kickstarter

“Nobody’s created a writing game quite like Elegy before,” the developer said. “How do we engage with people to get them to write? Does the art convey enough to give writers something to run with? Is it even the kind of game people will want to play? In the 15 years during which we’ve been in business, we’ve had projects take much longer than expected, and have had to cancel others outright.”

“Elegy” may be about a dead world, but let’s hope the project itself comes to life.

Reblogged from: eurogamer

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Weird Places of The Franz Kafka Videogame Coming In 2014

The first time I ever heard of Franz Kafka was in English class, when my teacher looked up from the short #story I had spent the previous lesson writing to exclaim, “Oh! This is quite Kafkaesque.” I only remember this so well because she then said that I had the best imagination in the class. What she really meant, of course, was that I was a bit weirder than everyone else, and I’m just fine with that.

However, the pieces of fiction I ended up writing during my school years are nowhere near as bizarre, nightmarish and illogical as the work of the man himself, Franz Kafka. So, you can imagine a game based on Kafka’s work to be quite…well, interesting. And that seems to be the case if you take a look at Denis Galanin’s The Franz Kafka Videogame. If you didn’t know, Denis won lots of awards for his previous #adventure game, Hamlet, so this follow-up from him has some pressure riding upon it. Luckily, it’s already looking pretty spiffing.

Denis got in touch to inform us that The Franz Kafka Videogame has a plot based on select Kafka works, as you might expect, including “The Castle,” “The Metamorphosis,” “Amerika” and some others. You follow a guy called K., who for a long time is unemployed, but the game’s events start to get going when he suddenly gets an offer of employment out of the blue which he cannot refuse, given the current state of matters.

As with most new jobs, this drastically changes K.’s life, and he is apparently forced to go on a voyage beyond his homeland, which is something he’s never done before. Much to his surprise, outside of his small town, K. finds a completely bizarre world. As we know, what K. is actually witnessing is the weaving of the strangest events from various Kafka novels, the poor guy, so it’s going to make absolutely no sense at all.

“Together with the hero, you will experience an atmosphere of absurdity, surrealism and total uncertainty.”

As you can see in the game’s trailer, The Franz Kafka Videogame takes place during the turn of the 20th century mostly, which is when Kafka was writing, so that makes sense. There appears to be scenes taking place during World War I with a large tentacle monster present, bug detectives dining at posh restaurants serving origami puzzles to solve and an absurd puzzle in which K. has been shrunk down along with his dog and tries to make his way across a board game.

I’m sure you’ll agree the artwork really suits the slightly bizarre tone of the game, and it looks like it won’t lend itself to pixel hunting puzzles, as with far too many adventure games, focusing instead on more traditional and obvious puzzles for players to solve. Looking good overall, then. The Franz Kafka Videogame is coming to Windows, Mac, Linux, iOS and Android in 2014.

Reblogged from: indiestatik.com

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